SfMB's MONTHLY PLAYLIST 

June 30, 2022

Storefront Manitoba's Playlist is a monthly curated list of films, podcasts, and other resources that aim to entertain, inspire, enrich, and advance critical discussion. 

 

In honour of Pride Month, this playlist compiles stories that trace a labyrinthine path towards equity and liberation for the gay community. Featured is the Stonewall Inn, an instigating contested space in the history of gay rights. Other highlighted queer spaces include clubs, the new Canadian monument to the LGBTQ2+ community, and the first instance of gay & lesbian elder housing in the US. We investigate the origins of some of the associated iconography i.e. buttons, t-shirts, and the now-ubiquitous flag. This playlist celebrates contemporary LGBTQ2+ designers and activists who are changing the world as we know it, and commemorates their predecessors who challenged an even more unforgiving status-quo. Together they have generated a paradigm of queer opportunity that we honour this month, and every month.

 

Please note, some streaming services may require a free library or university card for access.

 

FEATURE FILMS & VIDEOS 

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HOW THE PRIDE RAINBOW FLAG CAME TO BE

NBC Out

2016 | 5 Minutes 

It all started with $1,000 and 1,000 yards of fabric. Hear from Gilbert Baker, the creator of the rainbow pride flag. “It celebrates the way we are all different and yet connected.”

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A PLACE TO LIVE: THE STORY OF TRIANGLE SQUARE

Directed by Carolyn Coal

2008 | 80 Minutes

"A Place to Live" follows the journey of seven individuals as they attempt to secure a home in Triangle Square, the nation's first affordable housing facility for LGBT seniors. Since demand far exceeded the number of available units, a lottery system was established to select who would live in the complex. Not everyone will be chosen. "A Place to Live" is both a moving portrait of gay and lesbian seniors on the fringe of our community and the triumph of the opening of this historic building.

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THUNDERHEAD ANNOUNCED AS WINNING ENTRY FOR LGBTQ2S+ NATIONAL MONUMENT

Canadian Heritage

2022 | 1 Minute

Hear more about the winning proposal for the national LGBTQ2S+ monument in Ottawa, submitted by a team full of Winnipeggers! The design was conceived by the Winnipeg-based team led by Liz Wreford, Peter Sampson and Taylor LaRocque of Public City, with artists Shawna Dempsey and Lorri Millan, and Albert McLeod, Indigenous and Two-Spirited People subject-matter expert and advisor.

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REVIVING THE ROOST

Directed by Vivek Shraya

2019 | 6 Minutes

Filmmaker and bestselling author Vivek Shraya’s ode to a popular Edmonton gay bar that closed in 2007. With pulsating neon-light animation, Reviving the Roost is a story about community complexity and longing, and an elegy to a lost space.

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GENDER, SEXUALITY, AND

MODERN DESIGN

Bard Graduate Centre

2016 | 104 Minutes

A presentation at the Bard Graduate Centre from professors Aino Aalto, Alice T. Friedman, Mary McLeod, and Jasmine Rault.

PODCASTS & AUDIO 

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REMEMBERING STONEWALL

99% Invisible

2016 | 26 Minutes 

Throughout the 1950s and ’60s, there were few establishments that catered to members of the LGBTQ community. But the Stonewall Inn was a noted exception. The bar welcomed even the most marginalized members of the gay community. It was a favorite spot for drag queens, transgender people, lesbians, and more.

Early on the morning of Saturday, June 28, 1969, officers from the New York City Police Department’s vice squad pulled up in front the Stonewall Inn.

 
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MISS CHIEF EAGLE TESTICKLE, KENT MONKMAN'S ALTER EGO

2020 | 2 Minutes

Kent Monkman tells the story of his alter ego, Miss Chief Eagle Testickle, in an interview with the MET museum. “I created Miss Chief Eagle Testickle to offer an Indigenous perspective on the European settlers and to also present a very empowered point of view of Indigenous sexuality pre-contact. We had our own traditions of gender and sexuality that didn’t fit the male-female binary.”

RESOURCES

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WEARING HISTORY: A COLLECTION OF LGBTQ2+ BUTTONS AND T-SHIRTS

The Arquives: Canada's LGBTQ2+ Archives

Though small, buttons and pins communicated pivotal concerns of the LGBTQ2+ community to the world. With the earliest item dating to 1977, the buttons in this collection speak to issues in human rights, health, and politics up to the 2010s. T-shirts are an important medium of expression for the LGBTQ2+ community; allowing subcultures to demonstrate what they stood for and expand their membership, and giving organizations the chance to raise awareness for issues like AIDS and homophobia. T-shirts and dresses also provided a simple but effective way for LGBTQ2+ to showcase their pride in themselves and their nonconformity.

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NIIZHO-MANIDOOG: A TWO-SPIRIT FASHION LOOKBOOK

By: Alya Ansari

2019

Niizho-Manidoog is an Anishinaabe word that refers to and honors those Indigenous people who embody the spirit of two genders. These individuals are said to have a “Two-Spirit” identity. The newest collection from the Indigenous designer honors this sacred space of nonconformity, diversity, and resistance.